BEYOND CURIOUS

A Mobile Survey

for JD Power

Converted a long paper questionnaire into an easy to use mobile app that engages & rewards users.

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Overview

Beyond Curious brought me in for a mobile app that re-imagines JD Power's automotive survey, currently on paper. The app was to make the survey easier to fill out, engaging and accessible to a younger demographic.

MY ROLE

Working on the experience with the assistance of the Strategist, Senior Researcher, and the Experience Director.

STARTING POINT

An overview of the project that included key components of the survey and an in-depth amount of user research. The UX strategist provided me with the personas, user journeys, and flows.

TEAM

While I had much autonomy on this, I was also able to collaborate with the team frequently to review and get feedback, which was invaluable. The BC team is great, so it was a fun experience overall.

TIME FRAME

This project was about three weeks and involved a lot of rough exploration and iteration. 

CLIENT

Beyond Curious

ROLE

UX/UI 

DESIGN TEAM

A. Kelley, Experience Director
K. Robles, Manager, Experience Research
C. Young, Senior Experience Strategist
E. Gripp, Project Manager

 

A Rapid Approach

Defined Challenges 

1

Time

The questionnaire is time-consuming. Depending on the responses to each question, the content and completion time greatly varies.

2

Engagement

Encouraging people to take the test will be challenging. There would be no monetary reward, which meant exploring avenues of motivation to both start and complete the survey. 

3

Large Target Audience

While the app was to entice younger users, it still needed to be accessible to everyone, all ages and both IOS/Android.

Sketched Concepts

Started with sketches and wireframes of the key features and iterated on the more complicated features.

Screen Shot 2018-05-02 at 5.08.15 PM
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Developed Engagement Ideas

We experimented with ways to make the experience enjoyable and encourage completion of the survey. The idea was to put together some rough concepts quickly. Not all were winners but provided the opportunity to test different options. 

Gamification

Allowed users to earn another piece of a car with each completed test. 

Community Metrics

Stats on how many people were also taking the test, how many people have had the same complaints as you, etc.

Useful Tips

Personalized tips on how to care for your car, useful knowledge or fun trivia.

Social Good

Tested language that sharing product experiences leads to improved consumer products on the market.

Gathered
User Feedback

With the Senior Researcher, I tested some of our prototypes. He put together the questions and led the interviews, I created the prototypes and took notes. At the end of one day of interviews, we outlined some consistent pain points and revised the prototypes accordingly for the next set of interviews.

This was a quick and rough, but valuable process. Though we presented far from seamless prototypes, the user insight gathered was helpful. We only interviewed about 8 people during the initial design process, but many comments were universal and saved time moving forward. 

 
INSIGHTS

Questions revolved around three topics:
Motivation, Features, and Usability.

1

Motivation

Users were not excited about filling out a long questionnaire for free. Younger participates overall were more open than older. Presenting the questionnaire as a rating system, encouraging the idea that one user's feedback would improve everyone's shopping experiences also tested better with a younger demo.

2

Features

Gamification features, like badges or building a car did not drive users. Instead, it seemed to confuse and annoy them. Stats, facts, and humor proved more successful. The idea of sweepstakes entries for completed surveys had a mixed appeal.

3

Usability

Interactions were not clear enough. Android users were confused by the swipe states we had set up and expected tap. We assumed it would be obvious how to skip a question. Users seemed to want a clear button or automatic move to the next state, not a swipe.

 

The Experience

The Results

After our final testing session, I redesigned the comps accordingly. This included:

  • Revised interactions to be more explicit
  • Removed swipe behavior
  • Clarified when users could or did skip a question
  • Eliminated implicit gaming elements 
  • Encouraged completion of surveys by breaking them up into smaller sections. 

The app experience is presented as a place to share your excitement or frustrations regarding your purchase. We choose copy that described it as a utilitarian resource to help consumers improve products on the market.

After each completed survey, tips on caring for the user's car or an interesting fact is presented. Previous feedback from other users is shared.

 
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1

Onboarding

User logs in with pin they received in the mail, they confirm their personal details and car.

2

Dashboard

Introduces and shows progress on surveys. Moves users into each..

Older version on the right is before updates.
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3

Surveys

Each survey is divided into multiple sections with questions in each. A survey starts with a full screen animated divider introducing the topic and how far to completion.

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Survey-Intro 3

4

Intro Tutorial

Before the first survey, a quick tutorial introduces how it works. Questions can be skipped and returned to later.

5

Questions

There are 6 types of question UI.

  • A binary value
  • Rating system
  • Slider
  • Radio button
  • Check boxes
  • Text Description

Per user testing feedback, screens move forward to the next question, with a slight delay, once an answer is received.

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Rate
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Radio
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Desc
I'm danielle...

a designer with a focus on products.

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Let's chat.

I'm not on social media, but you can email me. 

emaildanielle@gmail.com →




© 2018 DANIELLE MARIE